Now Showing

The School of Art Gallery is open Monday to Friday 10:00 to 17:00.

We are closed over Easter, Christmas and the New Year. Admission is free.

(There are intervals for exhibition change-overs. Please check the exhibition dates here on the website or call before your visit to avoid disappointment.)

 

Postgraduate Show

10th - 26th September 2018

(Upstairs Galleries)

This year's exhibition features the works of 19 postgraduate students in a variety of media such as photography, painting, illustration, printmaking and video installation. 

  

 

 

 

 

11 June - 28 September 2018 

DISCOURSE
Reynolds to Rego
 
(250 years of prints by Royal Academicians, from the School of Art Collections) 
 
Marking both the centenary of the teaching of art at Aberystwyth University and 250 years of the Royal Academy of Arts, this exhibition of prints by and after Royal Academicians sheds light on the evolving role of print practice as a means of reproduction, communication and creative expression. It examines changes in attitude towards printmaking over two hundred years, from founding president Sir Joshua Reynolds’ discourses on art as the product of the mind ‘not the industry of the hands’ to contemporary conversations with the language of print. ‘What is a well-chosen collection of pictures,’ Reynolds mused, ‘but walls hung round with thoughts?’
 
This ‘well-chosen collection of pictures’ presents works by 100 Academicians represented in the School of Art Museum collections including prints by or after Joshua Reynolds, Henry Fuseli, J. M. W. Turner, John Everett Millais, Edward Burne-Jones, Frederic Lord Leighton, Augustus John, Laura Knight, Eduardo Paolozzi, Allen Jones, David Hockney, Paula Rego, Eileen Cooper and Anne Desmet.

  

 

21 May - 28 September 2018

Sea Change  (Tessa Sidey Gallery) 

(in connection with the Visit Wales Year of the Sea - theme)

Sea Change is a student-curated exhibition of prints, paintings, photographs and ceramics from the School of Art collection.  The exhibition borrows for its title a phrase from Shakespeare’s Tempest to explore its metaphorical potential.