Research Advisory Network

The Institute of Literature, Languages and Creative Arts Research Advisory Network is made up of senior academic staff who work closely together to strongly encourage the development of staff research in the Institute. Research Advisory Network members can provide insights into the funders’ expectations, and give specialist academic advice on a project's case for support and methodology.  When seeking support, you are also encouraged to contact the research development officers, who can give you ‘hands-on’ support with developing your grant application and will also act as a liaison with the most appropriate person from the RAN for your project. Alternatively contact the Research Office on research@aber.ac.uk or telephone on: 01970 62(8734).

 

Professor Birgit Beumers

Professor in Film Studies - BA (Hons) CNAA 1986; DPhil (Oxon) 1991

Contact

  • Email: bib2@aber.ac.uk
  • Office: FS4 Parry-Williams Building
  • Phone: 01970 622958
  • Fax: 01970 622831

Research

Birgit specialises in Russian culture, especially theatre and film, as well as Central Asian and European cinema. She has written a monograph on Yuri Lyubimov at the Taganka Theatre; on the filmmaker Nikita Mikhalkov and his Oscar-winning film Burnt by the Sun; and on Russian popular culture. With Mark Lipovetsky, she has co-authored a book on violence in Russian drama and cinema. She is the author of A History of Russian Cinema and has edited and co-edited several volumes on Russian cinema, visual culture and media, including a volume on the filmmaker Alexander Sokurov. During 2007-2009 she held a Leverhulme Research Fellowship and in 2013 she was a Visiting Fellow at the Central European University in Budapest to do research on early Russian and Soviet animation, as well as special effects and technical innovation in Soviet cinema of the first half of the 20th century.

 

Colin Cruise

Reader in Art History - DipAD (Hornsey) PGCE (Middx) MLit (Keele) PhD (Keele)

Contact

Research

Before starting an academic career in Victorian Studies, Cruise studied Fine Art, specialising in printmaking and painting. His PhD thesis concerns English Literature of the 1890s in relation to religion, art, and gender. He has published widely on aspects of Victorian culture, including ‘Versions of the Annunciation’ (After the Pre-Raphaelites, MUP 1999); ‘Baron Corvo and the Key to the Underworld’ (The Victorian Supernatural, CUP 2003); and ‘Sincerity and Earnestness: Rossetti’s Early Exhibitions’  (Burlington Magazine, January 2004).  He contributed three entries on Victorian artists to the Dictionary of National Biography.  Recent publications include book chapters on Pater (for Macmillan), on Burne-Jones (for the Yearbook of English Studies) and on Simeon Solomon (for Ashgate); he has a forthcoming chapter on drawing in The Cambridge Companion to Pre-Raphaelitism.

Cruise curated the major exhibition Love Revealed: Simeon Solomon and the Pre-Raphaelites (2005-6)—which toured Villa Stuck, Munich, and the Ben-Uri Gallery, London—and organised the accompanying conference for the National Portrait Gallery, London (2006), and the symposium at Yale BAC (2006). The exhibition catalogue was published by Merrell in 2005.

Cruise is a Member of the AHRC Peer Review College (since 2007); a Member of both the AHRC Postgraduate Panel (since 2008) and Collabrative Doctoral Awards Panel (since 2010); and served as Chair of the Association of Art Historians (2004-07).  He is a member of the academic advisory panel for a major JISC-funded project to digitise all Pre-Raphaelite works at BMAG and is curator of an international touring exhibition on Pre-Raphaelitism, The Poetry of Drawing (catalogue to be published by Thames and Hudson in December 2010).  He was the holder of the first Pre-Raphaelite Fellowship jointly awarded by the University of Delaware and the Delaware Art Museum in 2008.

Teaching and research supervision covers 19th-century art and its cultural contexts in social history and religion; Pre-Raphaelitism; the Aesthetic Movement; the identity of the artist in British art c.1800-c.1960; the history of drawing.

 

Dr Winifred V. Davies

Reader in German

Contact

Research

Wini Davies’s research interests include German sociolinguistics, especially processes of standardisation and attitudes towards non-standard varieties of German. At present she is working with colleagues in Switzerland and Luxembourg on a project investigating the level of acceptance of the pluricentric model among teachers of German in Germany, Switzerland and Luxembourg. See: https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/eurolangs/research/current-research/teachers-as-norm-authorities/

 

Dr Matthew Francis

Professor in Creative Writing - BA, MA (Cantab) PhD (Southampton)

Contact

Research

Best-known as a poet, Matthew is also a novelist, short story writer and critic, with an interest in twentieth-century and contemporary poetry and fiction, and in particular the twentieth-century Scottish poet W.S. Graham.

Of Matthew's most recent collection of poems, Muscovy (Faber, 2013), The Guardian wrote: "These tales of the unexpected are a treat, melding modernist tricks of the light with the phosphoric glow of 'the long night called / the nineteenth century', full of suspense and charisma."

His other collections of poetry are: 

  • Mandeville (Faber, 2008) – “Mesmerising - an extraordinary achievement” (The Observer);
  • Whereabouts (rufus books, 2005) – “Superb” (The Guardian)
  • Dragons (Faber, 2001) – shortlisted for the Forward Prize and The Welsh Book of the Year Award
  • Blizzard (Faber, 1996) – shortlisted for the Forward Prize and winner of the Southern Arts Prize

He is also the author of a critical study: Where the People Are: Language and Community in the Poetry of W.S. Graham (Salt, 2004) and a novel WHOM (Bloomsbury, 1989), and editor of W.S. Graham’s New Collected Poems (Faber, 2004). His collection of stories Singing a Man to Death (Cinnamon 2012) has been shortlisted for the Wales Book of the Year Award. He is currently working on a novel set in Wales and London in the seventeenth century, as well as a new collection of poems.

 

John Harvey

Professor of Art - BA (CNAA) MA (Wales) PhD (Wales) FRSA

Contact

Research

Harvey is a historian of art, visual culture, and sound art, and also a sound- and visual-art practitioner.  His research field is the visual and sonic culture of religion, principally.  In his historical studies, he engages the imagery and sonorities of popular piety, the Judaeo-Christian scriptures, supernaturalist traditions, and working-class culture.  His books include The Bible as Visual Culture (2013), Photography & Spirit (2007/10), The Appearance of Evil: Apparitions of Spirits in Wales (2003), Image of the Invisible: The Visualization of Religion in The Welsh Nonconformist Tradition (1999), and The Art of Piety: The Visual Culture of Welsh Nonconformity (1995).  Harvey has also contributed numerous chapters and articles to books and journals including ‘The Ghost in the Machine’ in The Ashgate Research Companion to Paranormal Culture (Ashgate, 2013), ‘Framing the Word’ in Bible, Art, Gallery (Sheffield Academic Press, 2012), ‘Visual Culture’ in The Handbook of Research Methods in Religious Studies (Routledge, 2011), and ‘The Bible and Art in Wales’ in Imaging the Bible in Wales (University of Wales Press, 2010). He has also convened conferences including, most recently, ‘The Noises of Art: Audiovisual Practice in History, Theory and Culture’ (Aberystwyth University/The Courtauld Institute of Art, London, 2013), and delivered keynote and other scholarly papers at conferences held in the UK, Europe, and USA.

In his practice, Harvey explores non-iconic attitudes to visualization and sonic articulations of religion through an engagement with visual, textual, and audible sources, theological and cultural ideas, and systemic and audiovisualogical processes. His visual work, exhibited in the UK and USA, is discussed in The Pictorial Bible series publications (School of Art, 2014/07 and National Library of Wales, 2000). Harvey’s sound-art work is available through The Aural Bible series of publications, including R B V E Ǝ T N Ƨ O A E V A N R O B E R T S (National Screen & Sound Archive of Wales, 2014), and on his personal sound art website ‘sound.johnharvey.org.uk’ (see below).

Presently, Harvey is Co-ordinator of eye-ear, a research group investigating the interrelationship of image, sound, and word. From 1999 to 2013, he was Director of the Centre for Studies in the Visual Culture of Religion. He has been a member of the Advisory boards for the journal of Biblical Reception (2010), the International Advisory Board of the Material Religion journal, USA/UK (2005_–9), and the Institute of Studies in Sacred Architecture, USA (2003).

 

Marged Haycock

Professor - BA (Cantab.), MA, PhD (Wales)

Contact

  • Email: mah@aber.ac.uk
  • Office: D34, Hugh Owen Building
  • Phone: +44 (0)1970 621815 

Research

Professor Marged Haycock is a literary critic specialising in early Welsh poetry — the work attributed to the Cynfeirdd and the Gogynfeirdd — and is particularly interested in the variety of material surviving from the period between c. 600 and c. 1400. A study of early religious and scriptural poetry, Blodeugerdd Barddas o Ganu Crefyddol Cynnar (1994), won the Sir Ellis Griffith Prize of the University of Wales, and has been a key text for scholars writing on Christianity in early Wales. Her work on the richest and most enigmatic of the ‘Four Ancient Books of Wales’ and the figure of Taliesin, resulted in two standard editions and studies, Legendary Poems from the Book of Taliesin (2007), and Prophecies from the Book of Taliesin (2013). Her work in this field informs three part II modules, on Early Heroic Poetry, the Later Cynfeirdd, and Poems of the Gogynfeirdd. Another long-standing research interest is reflected in her popular module on Women and Literature to 1500, and in a commissioned volume in progress for the University of Wales Press’ series Y Meddwl a’r Dychymyg Cymreig [Welsh Thought and Imagination]. She has published extensively on the significance and literary treatment of materials and comestibles in the Middle Ages — food, drink, hospitality, clothes and textiles — as well as on the literature of the Welsh Marches, and the reception of medieval literature, as for example in her treatment of the Princess Heledd in the Festschrift for Gwyn Thomas, Gweledigaethau, edited byJason Walford Davies in 2007.
In 2011, she was Distinguished Visiting Scholar in the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, University of California, Los Angeles, and in 2012-13 was invited to be part of an international team working at the Centre for Advanced Research at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. Some of this collaborative work on the early warrior cultures of North-West Europe is forthcoming in the volume Warrior and King, edited by Jan Erik Rekdal and Charles Doherty. The history of scholarship is another research strand being developed, in the light of her own experience as a textual scholar, for a biography of the scholar Sir Ifor Williams. Professor Haycock has acted as a member of the Peer Review College of the AHRC, has sat on various editorial and advisory boards, and has directed the Department’s postgraduate community for twenty-five years as well as supervising very many research students. She would very much welcome enquiries from students wishing to do research work in her fields of expertise.

 

Professor Matt Hills

Professor of Film & TV Studies - BA (Sussex), MA (Goldsmiths), PhD (Sussex)

Contact

  • Email: mjh35@aber.ac.uk
  • Office: FS 3, Parry Williams Building
  • Phone: 01970 621594
  • Fax: 01970 622831

Research

Media audiences and fandom; Doctor Who; Torchwood; Sherlock; cult film and TV more generally; digital culture. Matt is the author of a number of books. Cultographies: Blade Runner (Wallflower, 2011) specifically theorises Blade Runner’s cult status and engages with scholarly debates surrounding cult film and fandom. Triumph of a Time Lord: Regenerating Doctor Who in the 21st Century (IB Tauris, 2010) is aimed at both scholars and fans, this developed ideas initially set out in Fan Cultures and was positively reviewed in magazines such as SFX and Doctor Who Magazine. The Pleasures of Horror (Continuum, 2005) is a more wide-ranging study of the horror genre than is usual, taking in horror on TV, in news reportage, and within cultural theory itself as well as examining the ‘field of horror’ fictions across film and literature (and using a Bourdieuian approach to textual analysis). Doing Things With Cultural Theory (Hodder-Arnold, 2005) is a deliberately polemical book which explores performative approaches to academic work and cultural identities, Fan Cultures (Routledge, 2002) was published as part of the ‘Sussex Studies in Culture and Communication’ series and described by Henry Jenkins as “dynamite – and it’s going to blast a hole throughsome of the roadblocks and dead-ends in previous theories of fandom” (back-cover blurb).

I was awarded a £48,000 ‘Innovation Award’ Grant by the AHRB in 2002.  This project, on which I was sole investigator, was entitled ‘Reconceptualising the unconscious in qualitative audience research’, and ran for one year.  I appointed a Research Associate, Dr. Jamie Sexton, to work with me on the project. Research outcomes included articles for the US journal American Behavioral Scientist and for the University of Southern California journal Spectator (special issues on media fandom).

I was also awarded a £72,795 ‘BBC/AHRC Knowledge Transfer’ grant in 2007. This project, ‘Listener online engagement with BBC radio programming’, ran for 1 year and I had a part-time Research Associate working under me. Acting as a co-investigator with colleagues at Birmingham City University and London Metropolitan, my strand of the research involved studying online fan cultures in relation to celebrity DJs, then reporting back to BBC Future Media and Technology and BBC Audio and Music. I also published findings in a special issue of The Radio Journal (2009).

And in 2012-13 I was a co-investigator on the British Academy Small Grant World reception of the films of The Hobbit, awarded £4483.50 to study audience responses to these films across some 50 countries, aiming to receive and analyse more than 50,000 survey questionnaires, making this quite possibly the largest audience study ever undertaken in the world.

I am an Editorial Advisor to the Journal of Fandom Studies; I also serve on the Editorial Boards of Celebrity Studies, International Journal of Popular Communication, Journal of Popular Television, Science Fiction Film and Television, Television and New Media, and Participations: Journal of Reception and Audience Studies. I am also the Proofs Editor on Cinema Journal, and a founding editor of Intensitiies: The Journal of Cult Media.  

I also co-edit a book series for Amsterdam University Press, Transmedia: Participatory Culture and Media Convergence 

 

Professor Elin Haf Gruffydd Jones

Director of Welsh Language and Culture & Professor of Media and Creative Industries

Contact

Research

Minority/Minoritised Language Media, Media and Arts Policy, Sociolinguistics of Media, Identity and Politics of Media, Media Compliance and Regulation, Online and Social Media, Creative Translation, Multilingual Media Practices

 

Adrian Kear

Professor of Theatre and Performance - BA (Hons) [Manchester]; MSocSc [Birmingham]; PhD [Surrey]; FRSA

Contact

  • Email: ack@aber.ac.uk
  • Office: S22 Parry-Williams Building
  • Phone: 01970 622834
  • Fax: 01970 622831

Research

Research interests include: cultural performance and theatre as a public intellectual practice; politics, philosophy and performance; theories of event, mimesis and representation, contemporary European theatre and avant-garde performance; theatrical aesthetics and spectatorship; democratic, participative and non-professional performance.

Publications includeTheatre and Event: Staging the European Century (London: Palgrave, 2013), International Politics and Performance: Critical Aesthetics and Creative Practice (with Jenny Edkins) (London: Routledge, 2013), Psychoanalysis and Performance (with Patrick Campbell) (London and New York: Routledge, 2001), Mourning Diana: Nation, Culture and the Performance of Grief (with Deborah Lynn Steinberg), (London and New York: Routledge, 1999).

 

 

Research

Koppel’s work as an artist and filmmaker has been broadcast internationally and exhibited in galleries from The Tate Modern London, to MoMA New York. Koppel is also an award-winning director of film commercials and has made films for several of the world’s leading fashion designers such as Rei Kawakubo at Comme des Garçons. His most recent film ‘sleep furiously’ was nominated for a Golden Leopard at 2008 The Locarno International Film Festival and then became one of the most critically acclaimed new British films of the year, winning The 2009 Guardian First Feature Film Award.

 

Professor Richard Marggraf Turley

Professor of Engagement with the Public Imagination - BA, PhD (Leeds)

Contact

Research

Poet and literary critic, Richard has research interests in Romantic literary and political culture, Shakespeare and food security, and contemporary poetry. He is the winner of the 2007 "Keats-Shelley Prize" for poetry, and he won the 2010 Wales Book of the Year "People's Choice" for his third collection, Wan Hu's Flying Chair (Salt, 2009). He has been involved in several collaborative projects between the arts and sciences, and is a regular guest on BBC arts and culture programmes, including Radio 3's "The Verb" with Ian McMillan, and Radio 4's "The Today Programme" with John Humphrys.

 

Robert Meyrick

Professor, Head of School and Keeper of Art - BA (Wales) MA (Wales) Hon RE

Contact

Research

Robert Meyrick trained in fine art and art history and now principally writes on 20th-century British printmaking as well as the art and visual culture of Wales. He has researched and curated national touring exhibitions and written accompanying books for museums and galleries throughout the UK. In 2001 he was invited to become an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Painter-Printmakers in ‘recognition of his services to the art of printmaking in Britain’.

Robert is regularly invited to contribute chapters for books and catalogues, among them are: ‘Beyond Impressionism: The Davies Sisters as Collectors of Modern British Art’ in Radical Visions: British Art 1910-1950 (2006) and ‘Wealth Wise and Culture Kind: Gregynog in the 1920s and 1930s’ in Things of Beauty: What Two Sisters did for Wales (2007) for National Museum of Wales; ‘In Pursuit of Arcadia’ in Poets in the Landscape: The Romantic Spirit in British Art for Pallant House, Chichester (2007); ‘Pastoral Re-visions: Little Englandism in British Printmaking 1915-1935’ in Ancient Landscapes, Pastoral Visions for Southampton Art Gallery (2008); ‘Spoils of the Lumber Room: Early Collectors of Wood-Engraved Illustrations from 1860s Periodicals’ in Reading Victorian Illustration 1855-1875 (2012); and ‘Poised on the Edge: Keith Vaughan as Printmaker’ in Keith Vaughan – Figure and Ground (with Heuser, H., 2013). Robert’s books include: The Etchings and Engravings of Edgar Holloway (1996); John Elwyn (2000); Christopher Williams: An Artist and Nothing Else (2012); Sydney Lee Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné (2013); Gwilym Prichard: A Lifetime’s Gazing (with Heuser, H., 2013); Claudia Williams (with Heuser, H., 2013).

In 2012, Robert researched and curated a major exhibition of 150 paintings by Welsh painter Christopher Williams (1873-1934) for the National Library of Wales and, in 2013, a retrospective exhibition of prints by Sydney Lee RA (1866-1949) for the Royal Academy of Arts. Forthcoming projects include catalogues raisonné of prints by Joseph Webb (1908-1962) and Stanley Anderson RA (1884-1966) as well as a monograph on Christopher Williams.

Teaching and research supervision covers Fine Art (illustration and printmaking) and Art History (British printmaking since 1900, book illustration, the private presses, art in Wales, 19th- to mid 20th-century British Art, collecting practice, and material held in the School of Art collections).

 

Dr Paul Newland

Reader in Film & Director of Research for ILLCA - BA (Hons) English (Exeter), MA English and Film (Exeter), PhD (Exeter)

Contact

  • Email: pnn@aber.ac.uk
  • Office: S05 Parry-Williams Building
  • Phone: 01970 622952
  • Fax: 01970 622831

Research

Paul’s main areas of research are British film history, the representation of space, place, location, territory and architecture on film, and film sound and music. He has published widely on British cinema in the 1970s, including British Films of the 1970s (Manchester University Press, 2013) and the edited collection Don’t Look Now: British Cinema in the 1970s (Intellect, 2010). Published work on the representation of space and place on film includes The Cultural Construction of London’s East End (Rodopi, 2008) and the edited collection British Rural Landscapes on Film (Manchester University Press, 2015). Current projects include a co-edited book on British art cinema, work on the function of the voice-over in film, and further work on film and television music, architecture and spatiality.      

 

Professor Sarah Prescott

Professor of English and Director of Institute (ILLCA) - BA (York), PhD (Exeter)

Contact

Research

Sarah's main research has received external funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council, the British Academy and most recently the Leverhulme Trust, see below.  Her main research interests are in the area of eighteenth-century studies and include women’s poetry and fiction, pre-1800 Welsh writing in English, women's writing and Wales, authorship, feminist literary history and provincial literary culture.

Her current research interest is pre-1800 Welsh writing in English, particularly women's writing.  Her book on this topic Eighteenth-Century Writing from Wales: Bards and Britons was a runner-up for the 2009 Roland Mathias Prize for Welsh Writing in English.  In December 2011 Sarah was awarded £248,395 by The Leverhulme Trust for a three-year Research Project Grant on ‘Women’s Poetry 1400-1800 in English, Irish, Scots, Scots Gaelic and Welsh’. The study will provide a major new literary history of women's poetry in Ireland, Scotland and Wales from 1400 to 1800, covering poetry in Welsh, Gaelic, Scots, Scots Gaelic, Ulster Scots and English through a fully edited anthology with translations and an accompanying critical study. As Principal Applicant, Sarah will be working with fellow scholars Dr Sarah Dunnigan at the University of Edinburgh, Dr Marie-Louise Coolahan at the National University of Ireland, Galway, Dr Cathryn Charnell-White at the Centre for Advanced Welsh and Celtic Studies, Aberystwyth and a further Research Assistant on Scots Gaelic appointed in 2012. The project started in February 2013.

 

Professor David Ian Rabey

Professor of Drama and Theatre Studies - BA MA MA PhD

Contact

  • Email: ddr@aber.ac.uk
  • Office: F08 Parry Williams Building
  • Phone: 01970 622830
  • Fax: 01970 622831

Research

Educated at Universities of Birmingham and California, Berkeley. Artistic Director of Lurking Truth Theatre Company/Cwmni Gwir Sy’n Llechu, which he co-founded in 1986, and for which he wrote and directed the plays The Back of Beyond (written 1994-5, staged twice in 1996), The Battle of the Crows (written 1996, staged 1998), published as a single volume The Wye Plays (2004); also Bite or Suck (written 1996, staged 1997) and Lovefuries (The Contracting Sea and The Hanging Judge) (written 2002, staged 2004-5, published 2008). Performances in work by Howard Barker includes: The Exaggerator in Don’t Exaggerate, Sleen in The Early Hours of a Reviled Man, title role in (Uncle) Vanya at Theatr Clwyd and Theatr y Castell, Aberystwyth; Isonzo in Barker’s own (English language premiere) production of his play The Twelfth Battle of Isonzo, in Dublin (2001) and on tour in Ireland and Wales (2002); Lamp in Blok/Eko (world premiere, directed by Barker, The Wrestling School/Exeter Northcott/Exeter University, 2011); other performance work, for Lurking Truth: Carlos in The Bewitched (Barnes), Perowne in AC/DC (Williams) and Badger in Bite or Suck. Departmental directing work includes The Sons of Light (Rudkin), The Europeans (Barker), Titus Andronicus (Shakespeare), Coriolanus (Shakespeare), Heartbreak House (Shaw), Dreaming (Barnes), Crash (stage adaptation by Rabey of Ballard’s novel), Saint’s Day (Whiting), Ursula: Fear of the Estuary (Barker), The Master and Margarita (Bulgakov, adapted Rudkin), Stone City Blue (Thomas), Merlin Unchained (Rudkin, world premiere), Antony and Cleopatra (Shakespeare), The Freedom of the Graveyard (a stage adaptation by Rabey of Gaiman’s novel The Graveyard Book, world premiere) and The Forty (Barker, world premiere). External directing includes work in Aberystwyth, Cardiff and Swansea and Dublin, including That Slidey Dark by Nigel Wells (1994). He is an Associate of Howard Barker's theatre company, The Wrestling School.

David’s publications include Howard Barker: Ecstasy and Death (Palgrave: Basingstoke, 2009), English Drama Since 1940 (Longman's Literature in English Series: London, 2003), David Rudkin: Sacred Disobedience (Harwood: Amsterdam, 1997), Howard Barker: Politics and Desire (Macmillan/Palgrave: Basingstoke, 1989; 2nd edition, 2009), British and Irish Political Drama in the Twentieth Century (Macmillan: Basingstoke, 1986). Co-edited collections include Howard Barker's Art of Theatre (co-edited with Sarah Goldingay, Manchester: Manchester UP, 2013), Theatre of Catastrophe: New Essays on Howard Barker (co-editor with Karoline Gritzner: Oberon Books: London, 2006), Lovefuries (Intellect Books, Bristol / Chicago UP, 2008), The Wye Plays (Intellect Books, Bristol / Chicago UP, 2004).

David’s forthcoming publications include Theatre and Time, (Intellect Books, forthcoming 2016), The Theatre of Jez Butterworth (Methuen/Bloomsbury Critical Companions series: London; forthcoming February 2015),

 

Professor Heike Roms

Professor in Performance Studies - PhD (Wales), MA (Hamburg), PGCTHE (Aberystwyth), FHEA, FRSA

Contact

  • Email: hhp@aber.ac.uk
  • Office: FF3, Parry-Williams Building
  • Phone: 01970 621911
  • Fax: 01970 622831
  • Personal Web Site:http://www.performance-wales.org/

Research

I am currently completing a monograph entitled When Yoko Ono did not come to Wales: Locating the History of Performance Art. The book emerges from my AHRC-funded research project, “‘It was forty years ago today…’ - Locating the early history of performance art in Wales 1965-1979” [http://
www.performance-wales.org]
My research interests include:

  • Histories of performance art (especially in Wales and the UK generally)
  • Performance, archiving, documentation and historiography
  • Disciplinary histories and genealogies of performance studies
  • Teaching the avant-garde – Performance’s pedagogical histories
  • Performance and ecology; performance, landscape and environment

 

Professor Tim Woods

Professor in English and American Studies / Director of the Institute of Education, Graduate and Professional Development - BA (Bristol) MA PhD (Southampton)

Contact

  • Email: tww@aber.ac.uk
  • Office: Room F14, 1st floor, Cledwyn Building
  • Phone: +44 (0)1970 621775

Research

Tim's main teaching and research interests are Twentieth-Century writing; African literatures in English; Contemporary British and American poetry; modernist and postmodernist writing; and literary theory, especially Marxism and poststructuralism. He has a particular interest in the relationship of ethics to literature, as well as representations of history and memory in twentieth-century literature. He has supervised research degrees in a range of subjects including Ngugi wa Thiong’o and African fiction, contemporary British Poetry, contemporary American Poetry, Religion and the Metaphysics of Postmodernism, contemporary American Fiction, Emmanuel Levinas, Postmodernism and Nihilism, and Cyberpunk Fiction, and would welcome doctoral applications in any of these areas.  He is currently writing a book on post-apartheid South African Literature, and researching American poetry in 1950s and 1960s New England.