Module Information

Module Identifier
EN30120
Module Title
Reading Theory / Reading Text
Academic Year
2017/2018
Co-ordinator
Semester
Semester 1
Reading List
External Examiners
  • Ms Kirsti Bohata (Senior Lecturer - Swansea University)
 
Other Staff

Course Delivery

Delivery Type Delivery length / details
Workshop 10 x 2 Hour Workshops
Seminar 10 x 1 Hour Seminars
 

Assessment

Assessment Type Assessment length / details Proportion
Semester Assessment Essay Assignemnt  1 x 3000 word essay  60%
Semester Exam 3 Hours   Pre-release examination  1 x 3 hour pre-release examination (exam paper will be released to students 48 hours before the exam date)  40%
Supplementary Assessment Resubmit failed essay  1 x 3000 word essay  60%
Supplementary Exam 3 Hours   Resit failed exam  1 x 3 hour pre-release examination (exam paper will be released to students 48 hours before the exam date)  40%

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:


1. Analyse the relationships beteen different theoretical approaches

2. Reflect on their own critical practice in a theoretically informed way

3. Employ particular theoretical approaches in the critical analysis of literary text

4. Evaluate the significance of particular theoretical approaches for the practice of literary criticism.

Aims

To build upon the experience gained in the previous theory module, EN20120 Literary Theory, Debates and Dialogues and to enable students to explore the relationship between literary theory and literary analysis.
To enable students to gain experience of the practical application of literary theory to literary texts.

Brief description

The module aims to enable students to explore the relationship between literary theory and literary analysis by means of a weekly one-hour seminar and a weekly two-hour 'workshop' building upon the experience gained in previous theory modules. Thus, the key notion of the module is the provision of opportunities to gain experience of the practical application of literary theory to literary texts. It is intended that individual tutors are granted considerable scope to determine choice of material, and the precise definition and running order of topics. All tutors will, however, be expected to give equal emphasis to topics within three broad theoretical areas – politics and history; language and textuality; gender and sexuality – and to explore these topics in relation to four literary texts.

Content

The four literary texts on which workshops will be focused are:

William Shakespeare, The Tempest
Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights
Henry James, The Turn of the Screw

plus one text of the tutor's choice (indicative range from past practice: Daniel Defoe, Roxana; Jane Austen, Emma; Tennyson, selected poems; Virginia Woolf, Between the Acts; Toni Morrison, Beloved; Derek Walcott, selected poems; China Mieville, The City and the City)

The three broad theoretical headings, which all groups will use, are:
1. Politics and History
2. Language and Textuality
3. Gender and Sexuality

Tutors will decide individually on the order of treatment of these topics, and will match topic to text according to their own judgement. Tutors may wish to touch on several of the topics for a given text, rather than matching each of the four literary texts to just one of the four broad topics. In each week the one-hour seminar will be used to refresh and extend students' understanding of key theoretical concepts, and the two-hour workshop will be devoted to putting these concepts into use in the practical analysis of literary texts. Critical essays on the literary texts that have appropriate theoretical inflections will regularly be used as prompts and exemplars.

Module Skills

Skills Type Skills details
Application of Number N/A
Communication Students' writing in an academic context will be developed and assessed in the coursework and examination assignments. Oral skills will be developed in individual and group work in seminars, but not assessed.
Improving own Learning and Performance This will be developed during the course of the seminars and in the assessment of tasks.
Information Technology Students will be expected to present their work in word processed form (and will edit PC generated text); they will also be required to make use of computerized library resources.
Personal Development and Career planning This will be addressed in the module's emphasis on independent and group work, and its attempt to develop professional presentational skills.
Problem solving This will be developed during the course of the seminars and in the assessment tasks.
Research skills This will be developed during the course of the seminars and in the assessment tasks.
Subject Specific Skills Detailed critical and contextual analysis of literary texts and evaluation of the theoretical concepts.
Team work This is built into the pedagogy of the module - all students will work in pairs and/or groups to comment on theories in relation to texts.

Notes

This module is at CQFW Level 6