Module Information

Module Identifier
Module Title
National Identities in the British Isles 1801-1914
Academic Year
Intended for use in future years
Mutually Exclusive
Mutually Exclusive
Mutually Exclusive
Other Staff

Course Delivery

Delivery Type Delivery length / details
Seminars / Tutorials 10 x 1 hour seminars
Lecture 18 x 1 hour lectures


Assessment Type Assessment length / details Proportion
Semester Assessment Semester Assessment - 2 X 2,500 WORD ESSAYS  50%
Semester Exam 3 Hours   Semester Examination - 3hr closed exam  50%
Supplementary Assessment Supplementary Assessment  submit any missing or failed written work  50%
Supplementary Exam 3 Hours   Supplementary Examination - 3hr closed exam  50%

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module, students should be able to:
a) Demonstrate familiarity with a substantial body of historical knowledge relating to the formation of national identities in Britain and Ireland in the period 1800-1914.
b) Reflect critically on the formation of national identities in the four nations of the British Isles and their relationship to an overarching British identity.
c) Demonstrate familiarity with a wide range of historical techniques relevant to the study of national identities in the past
d) Gather and sift appropriate items of historical evidence
e) Read, analyse and reflect critically on secondary texts.
f) Develop the ability to evaluate strengths and weaknesses of particular historical arguments and where necessary challenge them.
g) Develop oral (not assessed) and written skills which will have been improved through seminar discussions and essays
h) Work both independently and collaboratively, and to participate in group discussions (not assessed).

Brief description

This module will examine the creation and development of national identities in the British Isles following the Union of Britain and Ireland in 1801. It will draw upon the theoretical work on the construction of 'imagined communities' to inform the discussion of specific themes. Among these themes will be the creation of a British identity and the tensions caused by competing identities; the generation of new 'traditions'; war and popular imperialism; attitudes to out-groups and gender; and the mobilisation of national allegiances in leisure activities, especially sport. The recent debate on the nature of 'British history' will also be discussed.

Reading List

Recommended Text
Keith Robbins Nineteenth Century Britain Primo search Linda Colley Britons: Forging the Nation 1707-1837 Primo search


This module is at CQFW Level 6