Module Information

Module Identifier
ED13020
Module Title
Childhood in Society
Academic Year
2017/2018
Co-ordinator
Semester
Semester 2
Co-Requisite
Co-Requisite
Co-Requisite
Reading List

Course Delivery

 

Assessment

Assessment Type Assessment length / details Proportion
Semester Assessment Assignment 1  1500 word essay on theories of childhood and the frameworks that have been used to understand them.  50%
Semester Assessment Assignment 2  1500 word essay on childhood in a particular geographical, social, or cultural context.  50%
Supplementary Assessment Assignment 1  1500 word essay on theories of childhood and the frameworks that have been used to understand them.  All failed elements of the assessments must be re-taken if the student's average mark falls below the required pass mark of 40%.  50%
Supplementary Assessment Assignment 2  1500 word essay on childhood in a particular geographical, social, or cultural context. 2,000-word essay on childhood in a particular geographical, social, or cultural context.   All failed elements of the assessments must be re-taken if the student's average mark falls below the required pass mark of 40%.  50%

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

Demonstrate an understanding of childhood as a socially-constructed concept.

Demonstrate their comprehension of the key frameworks shaping current and recent understandings of childhood.

Appreciate the range of ways in which childhood is understood and organised in a variety of international contexts, and critically evaluate the position of children in various societies.

Engage critically with debates relating to children's representation, agency, empowerment in a range of social and national contexts.

Brief description

Recent work in the sociology of childhood has contended strongly that childhood is a socially constructed phase of life, which can only be understood in a culturally - geographically- and/or historically-specific context. Or in other words,childhood is 'what members of particular societies, at particular times and in particular places, say it is.' (Wagg, 1992). These perspectives have posed a challenge to long-established norms, such as pure developmental explanations where childhood is defined with reference to the staged achievement of predetermined western-defined milestones in cognitive development and the gradual attainment of adult-defined logical competence (James & Prout 1997). Forming part of the Education and International Development degree scheme, this first-year introductory module will look at the ways in which different societies define, theorise and organise childhood, and introduce students to critical debates children's roles and their agency within society.

Aims

Outline the key definitions and theories of childhood from an international perspective and a variety of contexts.
Develop students' knowledge and understanding of the effects of political, social and historical contexts on the development of the theories of childhood.
Provide opportunities to critically analyse and evaluate relevant policies and apply key principles across international boundaries.

Content

Sessions may be a combination of lectures, seminars or workshops and will include the following topics:
Session 1 - Defining childhood, children and the role of education.
Session 2 - Childhood, family and social institutions.
Session 3 - Developmental and Sociological explanations of childhood.
Session 4- From 'childhood' to 'childhoods'.
Session 5 - Global childhoods 1: moving beyond western frameworks.
Session 6 - Global childhoods 2: localised experiences.
Session 7 - Children's agency.
Session 8 - Childhood and citizenship.
Session 9 - Children and the nation.
Session 10 - The internationalization of childhood? Globalization, migration and connectedness.

Module Skills

Skills Type Skills details
Application of Number Students will be encouraged to use and interpret statistical information relating to subjects studied on the course.
Communication Communication techniques are a vital element throughout lectures and seminars. Spoken communication throughout seminar activities. Written communication throughout written assessments.
Improving own Learning and Performance Feedback from the written assignment and personal reflection during seminar tasks encourage improved performance.
Information Technology Through use of students' own and University IT facilities for presentation of class and assessed work. Students will be encouraged to use resources provided on Blackboard.
Personal Development and Career planning Assessments will be relevant to students wishing to progress to local and international placements in childhood and education settings.
Problem solving Through critical evaluation of problems posed during the course, including relating course concepts to specific contexts.
Research skills Through finding information from the University library and the Internet to prepare for written and oral work.
Subject Specific Skills Students will gain a grounding in theoretical concepts relating to childhood, society and education, and will be able to critically evaluate how childhood is understood and organised in a range of contexts.
Team work Through contribution to group exercises and discussion.

Notes

This module is at CQFW Level 4