Module Information

Module Identifier
FM26120
Module Title
Fairy Tales
Academic Year
2017/2018
Co-ordinator
Semester
Semester 1
Pre-Requisite
Successful completion of Part I
Reading List
External Examiners
  • Dr Nathan L Hunt (Senior Lecturer - University of Derby)
 
Other Staff

Course Delivery

Delivery Type Delivery length / details
Lecture 10 x 3 Hour Lectures
 

Assessment

Assessment Type Assessment length / details Proportion
Semester Assessment 1 x 3,000 word essay:  Apply a critical reading to the filmic adaptations of a fairy tale or a character, with detailed analysis of the source in relation to the adaptation .  60%
Semester Assessment 1 x 2,000 word essay:  structural analysis of a film and how it reflects the fairy tale morphology (Propp).  40%
Supplementary Assessment 1 x 3,000 word essay (different topic).  1 x 3,000 word essay (different topic)Apply a critical reading to the filmic adaptations of a fairy tale or a character, with detailed analysis of the source in relation to the adaptation.  60%
Supplementary Assessment 1 x 2,000 word essay:  structural analysis of a different film and how it reflects the fairy tale morphology (Propp).  40%

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

1. Understand the genre of the fairy tale and its conventions;

2. Engage critically with the fairy tale as a source for films and cartoons;

3. Assess how the morphology of the fairy tale has shaped the genre of the romantic comedy;

4. Analyze the development of characters and stories when adapting fairy tales for the screen;

5. Assess techniques for the creation of a magical world;

6. Recognize the shifting social conventions through fairy-tale characters and their interpretations.

Brief description

The structures of the fairy tale lie at the heart not only of fairy-tale live-action and animated films, but they also inform the narrative structures of many films. This module first introduces the genre of the fairy tale as an oral tradition and its recordings in various collections, before analyzing its conventions, both structural and social. This forms the foundation for the analysis of some key films, which are compared to the tales and to their different versions.

Aims

• To understand the forms and conventions of the fairy tale.
• To read the different and shifting interpretations of social roles in fairy tales when they are translated onto the screen.
To analyse the films and their relationship to social change and to visual/technological possibilities.

Content

Course delivery:

10 x 3 hour Lecture/Seminar/Screenings


The module will cover key studies of the fairy tale and read a range of tales through different prisms (political, social, historical, structural). The fairy tales studied will then be tested in their visual renderings both as live-action and animated films.

SCHEDULE

Week 1: Introduction: The Fairy Tale

Week 2: Fairy Tales: collections, traditions, functions

Week 3: Character and action in the fairy tale

Week 4: The first fairy tales on screen: Lotte Reiniger

Week 5: 1001 Nights: Orientalism and The Thief of Bagdad

Week 6: Disney’s 1930s: Snow White and others

Week 7: The Beauty and the Beast: Cocteau, Disney and others

Week 8: From Sleeping Beauty to Maleficent

Week 9: Mermaids in animation and live-action

Week 10: Shifting roles in cinema: Emancipated/Empowered women?

Module Skills

Skills Type Skills details
Application of Number
Communication Students' written communication skills will be developed (e.g. appropriate language and style, accuracy, precision and ability to be concise). Opportunities will be given, through seminar sessions, for students to develop confidence in using their speaking and listening skills when communicating their ideas.
Improving own Learning and Performance Students will be able to develop their skills of information location and retrieval. Students will be given opportunities to develop note-taking skills. Students will develop their critical thinking skills. Through small group discussions and seminars students will be given opportunities to develop an awareness of the opinions of others and reconsider initial ideas if necessary.
Information Technology Students will be given the opportunity to develop their authorial and note-taking skills when planning for oral and written assignments. Students will be given opportunities to develop their skills using electronic search and retrieval of sources on the web and on library catalogues. Students will develop their reference skills and their ability to select relevant materials for the task. Blackboard will be the main form of communication and information sharing in this module.
Personal Development and Career planning Students will be given the opportunity to evaluate current knowledge and skills. Students will be encouraged to take increasing responsibility for managing their own learning. Students will be guided to build upon the knowledge gained from lectures and apply this to other areas.
Problem solving Students should be able to identify structures, and will be encouraged to critically reflect on the process by which particular frameworks inform the production and interpretation of films.
Research skills Students will be able to develop their skills of information location and retrieval. Students will be able to develop their textual analytic skills, and to learn to analyze texts in a focused and purposeful manner. Students will be encouraged to evaluate, interpret and reflect upon a variety of sources.
Subject Specific Skills Students will learn how to edit and prepare visuals for presentation purposes
Team work Students will be encouraged to prepare seminar presentations in small groups to encourage teamwork and division of work according to skills.

Notes

This module is at CQFW Level 5