Module Information

Module Identifier
TFM1220
Module Title
Broadcasting Society and Culture in the Twentieth Century
Academic Year
2018/2019
Co-ordinator
Semester
Semester 2
Reading List
External Examiners
  • Dr Helen Wheatley (Associate Professor - University of Warwick)
 

Course Delivery

 

Assessment

Assessment Type Assessment length / details Proportion
Semester Assessment 1.Essay on an aspect of the historiography of broadcasting (2000 words)  40%
Semester Assessment 2. Essay on topic covered on course (3000 words)  60%
Supplementary Assessment 1.Essay on an aspect of the historiography of broadcasting (2000 words)  40%
Supplementary Assessment 2. Essay on topic covered on course (3000 words)  60%

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

1. To demonstrate understanding of the body of historical knowledge on the history of broadcasting in the United Kingdom in relation to wider processes of social and cultural change.

2. To demonstrate an understanding of the relevant historiography, its evolution of the key problems currently addressed by historians in this field.

3. To demonstrate a capacity to recognise and analyse the key primary sources relating to the study of the history of broadcasting in the UK.

Aims

1. To develop understanding of the history of broadcasting in the United Kingdom in relation to wider processes of social and cultural change.

2. To develop understanding of the historiography of broadcasting, its evolution of the key problems currently addressed by historians in this field.

3. To develop an understanding of the key primary sources used to work on history of broadcasting in the UK.

Brief description

This module will situate broadcasting within the wider context of change in UK society since the 1920s. It will then touch on some the key issues in the historiography of the field, in particular the problems posed by the fact that that much broadcasting history has been 'liberal' in its orientation, institutional in its focus, and rarely concerned with linking broadcasting history to wider social processes. The course will then focus on key moments in the development of broadcasting history, looking at both the interpretations that dominate the field, how they were arrived at, and the problems associated with the sources on which such accounts are based.

Content

The course combines lectures and seminars. The lectures precede the seminars by one week, thereby giving time for students to assimilate the content and prepare for the seminars. Seminars will be based around discussions of key ideas, texts and critical issues, as well as the examination of relevant primary source materials. An indicative list of lecture topics follows:

1. Introduction to the course, aims, methods, and assessment.

2. Change in UK society since the 1920s - some key themes

3. The historiography of broadcasting history

4. Sources and methods on broadcasting history

5. The origins of broadcasting in the UK

6. The age of radio

7. Television and society

8. The BBC and social change after 1945

9. Broadcasting and society in the 1960s and 1970s

10 .The politics of broadcasting and broadcasting politics

11. Commerce, culture and broadcasting - the shifting sands of debate

Module Skills

Skills Type Skills details
Application of Number
Communication Students will be expected to contribute to in-class discussions and relate their own research progress orally in seminar groups. Their level of written literacy will be assessed in the assignments.
Improving own Learning and Performance Throughout the module, students will be asked to critically reflect on their own reading and understanding and to engage in self-directed learning in relation to the seminars and assignments.
Information Technology Students will be expected to use the web and the numerous e-learning resources within the library throughout the course.
Personal Development and Career planning Students will be encouraged to develop research skills, presentation skills, engage in group work, and develop their writing skills. These attributes will feed into their development as individual researchers, which will be particularly suited for an academic career or one in the field of media arts.
Problem solving Both assignments set problems, in the form of questions, that have to be solved using skills or analysis, reflection and research.
Research skills Students will be expected to demonstrate familiarity with the research skills necessary to make proper use of primary and secondary sources off and online.
Subject Specific Skills
Team work The seminars will be designed to encourage collective engagement with individual topics, at both the research and presentation stages.

Notes

This module is at CQFW Level 7