Module Information

Module Identifier
TP10020
Module Title
Theatre and Performance Design in Context
Academic Year
2022/2023
Co-ordinator
Semester
Semester 2
Reading List
Other Staff

Course Delivery

 

Assessment

Assessment Type Assessment length / details Proportion
Semester Assessment Critical Portfolio  Within set parameters, students present creative responses (equivalent to 1500 words) that illustrate their understanding of the scenographic ideas of five practitioners, one from each week of the module.  50%
Semester Assessment Essay  Students select and respond to one from a range of questions about scenographic practice and practitioners. 1500 Words  50%
Supplementary Assessment Critical Portfolio  Within set parameters, students present creative responses (equivalent to 1500 words) that illustrate their understanding of the scenographic ideas of five practitioners, one from each week of the module. If the supplementary assessment is a resit, different practitioners must be chosen from those featured in the original attempt.  50%
Supplementary Assessment Essay  Students select one from a range of questions about scenographic practice and practitioners. If the supplementary assessment is a resit, students must select a question different from the one originally responded to. 1500 Words  50%

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

Recognise a range of key scenographic concepts, methodologies and approaches.

Demonstrate awareness of these concepts, methodologies and approaches within a range of methods and modes of enquiry, including an individual process of research.

Demonstrate skills of personal organisation and management necessary for the effective conduct of individual tasks of enquiry.

Demonstrate a basic ability to present and communicate scenographic ideas.

Demonstrate a basic ability to engage in the critical analysis of practice.

Brief description

In this module students are invited to look afresh at the ways in which space, time, light, sound, object, costume, colour and form may be woven together to impact upon, and communicate with, the spectator. These explorations are informed by research into the work of exceptional practitioners within the broader field. The module will enable students to better understand a range of approaches to design, gain familiarity with a range of scenographic elements, and provide necessary contextual grounding. Further, the module seeks to provide students with the critical vocabulary necessary to discuss scenographic work (others’ and their own).

Aims

1. Introduce students to a range of key scenographic concepts, methodologies and approaches.
2. Facilitate students to begin developing an individual process of research.
4. Facilitate students develop a basic ability to present and communicate scenographic ideas.
5. Facilitate students to develop a basic ability to engage in the critical analysis of practice.

Content

6x 2hr Lecture/Seminars
4x 2hr Seminar/Workshops

Example outline (this will be updated appropriately every year):

Week 1: Introduction to the module, Blackboard, assessment details
Week 2: Space (Richard Wagner, Edward Gordon Craig, Hotel Pro Forma)
Week 3: Time (Fluxus, Agnes Denes, Olafur Eliasson)
Week 4: Light (Adolphe Appia, James Turrell, Jacqueline Hen)
Week 5: Sound (Italian Futurism, John Cage; Janet Cardiff)
Week 6: Costume / Bodies (Loie Fuller, Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven, Willa Kim)
Week 7: Study Skills – developing and researching portfolio ideas
Week 8: Study Skills – Essay research and planning
Week 9: Study Skills - organising creative materials for presentation; citing and referencing
Week 10: Study Skills – Essay writing and editing; citing and referencing

Module Skills

Skills Type Skills details
Adaptability and resilience Ability to deal with changing circumstances and environments. Adapting to working with other people with different preferences and priorities. Adapting to communicating to different audiences. Includes recognition that abilities grow over time; learning through mistakes; accepting feedback positively; constructive criticism.
Co-ordinating with others Developing the ability to present and defend, as well as adapt, one's viewpoint in discussion with others. Plan and conduct work outside of formally scheduled sessions.
Critical and analytical thinking Develop critical and analytical skills in relation to own work and others. Be able to articulate how and why specific ideas, principles, and practices work, have been translated and developed over time in different iterations.
Digital capability Broad based concept covering media and information literacy, digital research and problem-solving, creativity with digital tools as well as routine management of communication and social media tools.  Includes willingness to try new technologies, adapt to digital methods of working, understanding of digital footprint and its impact.
Professional communication The individual student’s ability to articulate and communicate ideas and opinions is developed across the duration of the module. This area of development is encouraged and assessed within all aspects of the processes and presentations required, and the assessment forms recognise effective communication through written, verbal and visual media.
Reflection Ability to reflect upon and articulate personal working processes and aesthetic choices in relation to critical concepts.
Subject Specific Skills The following subject specific skills are developed and directly or indirectly assessed: • describing, theorising, interpreting and evaluating performance texts and performance events from a range of critical perspectives; • reading the performance possibilities implied by a script, score and other textual or documentary sources; • engaging in performance and production, based on an acquisition and understanding of appropriate performance and production vocabularies, skills, structures and worki

Notes

This module is at CQFW Level 4