Module Information

Module Identifier
VE11300
Module Title
Form and Function (Year 1)
Academic Year
2024/2025
Co-ordinator
Semester
Semester 1 (Taught over 2 semesters)
Other Staff

Course Delivery

 

Assessment

Assessment Type Assessment length / details Proportion
Semester Assessment Midterm in-class written test  Written test comprising 30 MCQs and 3 SAQs covering any LO's up until time of assessment 90 Minutes  20%
Semester Assessment Oral Assessment  20 minute oral assessment covering LOs covered up until time of assessment  20%
Semester Exam Written exam - SAQ paper  Exam period assessment covering all LOs 90 Minutes  30%
Semester Exam Written exam - MCQ paper  Exam period assessment covering all LOs 90 Minutes  30%
Supplementary Assessment Resit Midterm in-class written test  Written test comprising 30 MCQs and 3 SAQs covering any LO's up until time of assessment 90 Minutes  20%
Supplementary Assessment Resit Oral Assessment  20 minute oral assessment covering LOs covered up until time of assessment  20%
Supplementary Exam Resit Written exam - SAQ paper  Exam period assessment covering all LOs 90 Minutes  30%
Supplementary Exam Resit Written exam - MCQ paper  Exam period assessment covering all LOs 90 Minutes  30%

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

Use standard anatomic terminology to describe parts of the body and their relationships to one another under examination conditions.

Describe the basic vertebrate body design and show understanding of comparative differences in common domestic species with particular emphasis on the musculoskeletal system in the veterinary context.

Demonstrate a basic understanding of the adult anatomy of the heart, great vessels and respiratory system in the common domestic species.

Describe the basic physiology and anatomy (both gross- and ultrastructural-) of the various tissues of the musculoskeletal, cardiorespiratory and integumentary systems, and their interactions with other body systems.

Describe the structure of the integument (including specialised regions e.g. hoof, horn, ear) in veterinary species and relate structure to function.

Present an overview of the anatomy and development of the central and peripheral nervous system, eye and ear in domestic animals.

Describe the generation of nerve signals and the integration of inputs and outputs of the nervous system to allow the animal to sense and control its internal and external environment, communicate, and move properly.

Discuss the microscopic structure of the nervous system, allowing an appreciation of function.

Describe the role of the key components of the male and female urogenital systems (renal, urinary and reproductive) in the male and female veterinary species.

Outline the main features of the oestrous cycle, fertilisation and pregnancy with reference to the hormones controlling the processes.

Describe the structure and function of the key components in the alimentary system under examination conditions.

Discuss how the basic metabolism of different species reflects the metabolites they absorb which, in turn, reflects the structure and function of their alimentary tract, comparing foregut and hindgut fermenters with carnivores and omnivores.

Apply knowledge of the physiology of studied body systems to the interpretation of diagnostic tests for common diseases e.g. blood glucose and diabetes mellitus.

Be able to demonstrate how module content can be applied to clinical settings and how it integrates with other modules

Brief description

This module will link together the “Cardiovascular and Respiratory”, “Locomotor”, “Integument”, “Neurology, Ophthalmology, and Special Senses”, “Endocrine”, Reproductive and Urinary”, and “Alimentary” systems, communicating the basic anatomical and functional understanding of these animal systems, in order to improve understanding of the linkages between these critical systems within the body. It will provide an overview of the normal structure and function of these body systems, setting the foundations that will be built upon further in the second year of the BVSc course. Understanding of the normal structure and function will enable appreciation of the signs and effects of dysfunction in disease, and the principles of treatment.

Content

Combining practical anatomy classes with lectures and small group teaching, this module examines the anatomy and physiology of the major body systems, both in normal function and in the context of common conditions of these systems encountered in veterinary general practice.
This module is arranged into body system strands, comprising: 1/ Cardiovascular & Respiratory, 2/ Locomotor (musculoskeletal), 3/ Integument (skin), 4/ Neurology, ophthalmology and special senses, 5/ Endocrine, 6/ Reproductive and urinary, 7/ Alimentary. This module sets the foundational knowledge upon which Form and Function in Year 2 will build by exploring the systems in greater depth and complexity via a spiral curriculum structure. Together, the Year 1 and Year 2 modules deliver the basis of the ‘Vet Capability’ Domain of RCVS Day One Competencies, which describes the clinical competences, and encompasses the practical skills, techniques and underlying veterinary scientific knowledge that veterinary surgeons must possess upon graduation.

Module Skills

Skills Type Skills details
Co-ordinating with others Team working and coordination skills developed during directed learning and anatomy classes where student work in small groups
Critical and analytical thinking Problem and case based directed learning sessions.
Professional communication Students develop professional communication throughout the course used in scenarios like oral exams and as part of EMS to communicate with professional colleagues.
Subject Specific Skills During the module, students will gain knowledge of veterinary anatomy, physiology, pathology terminology and other vocation specific knowledge required of a veterinary surgeon

Notes

This module is at CQFW Level 4