Gwybodaeth Modiwlau

Module Identifier
CRM9920
Module Title
Heritage, Arts and Antiques Crime Around the World
Academic Year
2021/2022
Co-ordinator
Semester
Semester 2
Reading List

Course Delivery

 

Assessment

Due to Covid-19 students should refer to the module Blackboard pages for assessment details

Assessment Type Assessment length / details Proportion
Semester Assessment Essay  An essay of 4000 words  70%
Semester Assessment Presentation  Presentation and discussion facilitation  30%
Supplementary Assessment Presentation  Presentation and discussion facilitation  30%
Supplementary Assessment Essay  An essay of 4000 words  70%

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

Identify, analyse and critically discuss the different methods of policing and preventing heritage, arts and antiques crime

Critically assess the causes of and multi-agency responses to heritage, arts and antiques crime

Critically evaluate the application of a variety of theoretical perspectives to heritage, arts and antiques crime

Have an understanding of the different forms and types of heritage, arts and antiques crime

Construct and facilitate a discussion on heritage, arts and antiques crime

Brief description

Behind the scenes of policing are groups of marginalised, but important, crimes which are rarely explored: heritage, arts, and antiques crime are one such group. Who protects heritage, arts, and antiques, and why should we protect them? This module invites students to explore criminology from a different perspective, where traditional criminological thought is reconsidered in a growing, dynamic field of criminological study. Students will consider and critically analyse a wealth of theoretical and practical perspectives relating to heritage, arts and antiques crime; drawing upon a wealth of new criminological resources. This module will be situated in a global context, examining both national (UK) and international approaches to policing, preventing and tackling heritage, arts and antiques crime. This module covers heritage, arts and antiques crime from a broad historical perspective, but considers the conditions of the 21st century, and how these contribute to the facilitation of heritage, arts and antiques crime.

Content

Introduction and overview of heritage, arts and antiques crime

The causes of heritage, art and antiques crime

Deliberate destruction of heritage, art and antiques

Theoretical and practical implications for policing and preventing heritage, arts and antiques crime

Private and public responses to heritage, arts and antiques crime in the UK and internationally

Trafficking and the illicit/illegal trade in arts, antiques and cultural objects

Art theft, fraud and forgery

A critical exploration of heritage, arts and antiques legislation in the UK and internationally, international

The plundering and looting of cultural property, arts and antiques

A critical exploration of the victims and consequences of heritage crime and arts and antiques crime are

Module Skills

Skills Type Skills details
Students will be required to employ critical and analytical thinking throughout this module, in conducting research into and collating qualitative date upon the areas of heritage, arts and antiques crime.
Students will need to identify an area on which to present, identify how to best facilitate debate among course colleagues, and manage this while in progress. Students will be required to think creatively throughout this module, as heritage, arts and antiques crime challenge many criminological and policing norms
Students will engage with contemporary examples of heritage, arts and antiques crime, and situate case studies in a real world context.
Students will be required to undertake an assessed presentation, and will be expected to present to a professional standard. They will also be expected to fully engage with all discussions and debates, which will be the cornerstone of each seminar. They will also be expected to demonstrate a high level of academic writing and referencing ability, producing written work to a high standard.
Students will be expected to maintain a reflective approach throughout this module in order to show the development in their own understanding of heritage, arts and antiques crime and issues relating to these crimes. This can then be applied in their assignments and class discussions/debates
Students will be expected to engage with, contribute to and access materials from Blackboard, and use technology to enhance their presentation (using such programmes as Powerpoint or Prezi).

Notes

This module is at CQFW Level 7